2016 Harvest

We harvested the plot on Tuesday, October 11. Total yield was 60 bushels per acre, not bad considering it was planted on June 1.

SWCD Supervisor Chris Branaman volunteered to harvest the plot for us.
SWCD Supervisor Chris Branaman volunteered to harvest the plot for us.

Even though harvested acreage was only a little over 7 acres, there were a couple of interesting items. First, as can be seen from the table at the bottom of the page, the presence of cover crops made little difference in yield. As this was the first year for cover crops, this was not a surprise. Check back in a few years to see if this changes.

We had weed issues on the southern side of the field. We don’t know why but the two southern strips, planted to cereal rye and annual ryegrass last fall, had significantly more weeds. However the northern strips using those two cover crops did not. We’re not sure if there was a problem spraying or what however yields for those two strips were lower.

10_10_161
The weeds – mostly grass – on the right covered two strip treatments. The rest of the field was relatively weed-free.

We had volunteer oilseed radish. The two oats/radish strips had some very lush plants. This also appears to have affected yields though not as severely as the weeds did. We don’t know why this happened. We planted last fall about two weeks after the recommended time but radish did germinate and emerge. This may have been from seeds which did not germinate last fall. It may also have been plants that did not winter kill. Last winter was extremely warm and even though oilseed radish typically winter kills, some may have survived. 1 Whatever the cause, it shows how a cover crop can become a weed.

Oilseed radish
Oilseed radish “infestation.”
kelsee_10_12_16
Our Purdue Extension intern holding a radish we “harvested” before cutting soybeans.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Most of the field looked good. We harvested by running a combine with a 20′ bean head down the center of each 40′ strip and stopped to measure from the yield monitor. This is not terribly scientific but we were looking for differences between strips, not absolute yield numbers.

Harvest in progress. We ran the combine down the center of each cover crop
Harvest in progress. We ran the combine down the center of each cover crop “treatment” to measure yield.

The following table shows the yields for the cover crop strips.

Click for a larger image to see yields.
Click for a larger image to see yields.
Map showing the cover crop strips planted in fall, 2016.
Map showing the cover crop strips planted in fall, 2016.

Our next step is to plant our 2016 cover crops. We also plan on soil testing the field. We do not expect to see much change in soil characteristics after just one year but plan to monitor this on a regular basis going forward.

1 Between December 1, 2015 and April 1, 2016 the lowest temperature in Whitestown, about 2 miles south of this field, was 19.7 degrees according to the National Weather Service. In fact, temperatures fell below freezing only in January and February. This is extremely warm for this area.

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